Africa, Alaska, Caribbean – 3 places to go off-grid

Africa, Alaska, Caribbean – 3 places to go off-grid

casandra No Comments

From www.off-grid.net

Chikoko Tree Camp South Luangwa National Park, Zambia Remote Africa Safaris is a small, family–run operation in Zambia with four intimate little camps, renowned for its excellent guides and remote, pristine locations and leopard sightings. Chikoko Tree Camp and its sibling Crocodile Camp are in South Luangwa National Park, and reached by canoe and foot via the parent camp, Tafika, where the owners John and Carol Coppinger and Bryan Jackson live. Neither has electricity or generators; they use solar lighting, gas freezers and radio communications, and to get a phone signal you have to go to the top of a termite mound on the edge of the park. Chikoko Tree Camp has three twin timber–and–grass chalets with big beds, crisp linens, flushing lavatories and steaming bucket showers. Amazing food is produced in hole–in–the–ground ovens and there are ice–cold beers on demand. There are also shady hammocks and lots of other cushioned spots for siestas. The emphasis is on walking and mountain biking with a team of excellent guides. The details Open from May 25 to October 31. Prices from US$480 per person per night on a full–board basis (remoteafrica.com).

You had better be going for a good long time to justify all those air miles. And these destinations prove that going off-grid does not have to mean roughing it.

But Petit St Vincent St Vincent and the Grenadines, the Caribbean has a gloriously ‘unplugged’ feel. Petit St Vincent is a beautiful private island between St Vincent and Grenada. It was substantially spruced up by new owners in 2011, but regulars say little of its previous spirit has been lost. While the whole vibe is rustic, it’s as exclusive as nearby Mustique with a celebrity clientele to match, so it’s actually a highly slick operation.

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Future is Fuel Cells

casandra 2 comments

The next great step forward in human civilisation will be the next generation of batteries, which have hardly progressed since the 1940s.

And the leading edge of battery research is in fuel cells. The proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising fuel cell technologies. This is the type of fuel cell that will end up powering cars, buses and maybe even your house. Here’s how they will work:

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